Tesla Model X Roof Recall In Germany Raises Questions About U.S.' Related Recall

KBA announced 195 vehicles are affected in that country, with a worldwide total of 12,308. What about the other 2,977?

The Tesla MCU case offered interesting insight into how recalls work worldwide. On June 22, 2020, NHTSA said it would investigate it. On January 13, 2021, it asked Tesla to fix the issue. KBA – Germany’s equivalent to NHTSA – asked Tesla about that seven months later, on January 25, 2021. In a way, taking almost six months to enforce another recall could be seen as progress: KBA will now recall Tesla Model X units with roof trim issues.

This is the same recall NHTSA issued back on November 17, 2020. Due to gluing issues with these roof trims, the Model X could lose “the front and spine cosmetic roof trim” while moving. According to the report, 9,136 cars made in 2016 are affected. InsideEVs has reported some of these cases.

According to KBA, 195 units of the Tesla Model X are probably affected by the problem in Germany. Curiously, Reuters reported KBA said that there are 12,300 cars with these issues worldwide. The article also states that 2015 cars have the same problem.

Checking the recall notice at KBA’s website, it actually informs that there are 12,308 Tesla Model X units involved with the issue and that some were produced in 2015. NHTSA only mentions cars made in 2016.

We have contacted KBA to try to learn more about where the information came from.

With so few cars affected in Germany, it is a mystery where the other 2,977 cars are if you exclude the 9,136 already recalled in the US and the 195 now in Germany. There’s no information about a similar recall in China, for example.

If these other cars are not there, it is possible that they are in the US and have not been included in the previous recall because it only related to vehicles manufactured in 2016. Since Tesla does not work with model-years as other companies, it is possible that the 2016 Model X was only produced in 2016. Again, it is something only Tesla or NHTSA could answer. Hopefully, one of them will.

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