The safest cars currently on sale from Mercedes to Skoda

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Europe’s safest cars have been revealed as the Euro NCAP safety ratings ‘Best in Class’ 2021 winners were named. The safety organisation crash-tests a cross-section of all new cars on sale each year and this time round one car came out on top in two categories.

The Mercedes EQ-EQS tested best in both the executive and pure-electric categories, beating the new Polestar 2 in the battle of battery-powered vehicles.

It was also a successful effort from Czech manufacturer Skoda, whose new Enyaq electric SUV won the safest ‘large off-road’ category.

Second place in that category also went to an electric car, BMW’s new iX.

Skoda also took home the prize for safest small family car with its Fabia.

Euro NCAP uses several factors to determine the safest cars, with the winner the car with the highest total in the category.

There have to be at least three entrants in each category, and the winners must achieve a five-star rating.

Cars cannot have any critical body region coloured in red during the testing.

If two cars have the same score then the winner is decided by which car is more affordable.

Euro NCAP ratings are based on four main categories: adult occupant, child occupant, vulnerable road users and safety assist, which assesses safety technology.

Each car tested is then awarded stars ranging from zero to five.

While the Best in Class winners were congratulated, this year also saw some disastrous results for manufacturers like Renault and Dacia.

Renault’s small electric offering the Zoe scored a shocking zero stars out of five, only the third car in history to do so.

During crash testing of the Zoe, the driver’s head directly impacted the car’s side pole.

The low score was apparently due to Renault removing safety equipment from new versions of the car.

This led to Euro NCAP board member, Matthew Avery saying: “The adult occupant score of 43 percent for the Zoe is the lowest we have seen in 11 years.

“It is a shame to see Renault threaten a safety pedigree built from the inception of the rating.”

Renault’s sister brand Dacia fared little better as its popular offering the Sandero received just two stars.

Euro NCAP said the vehicle’s autonomous emergency braking would not stop a collision with a pedestrian or cyclist.

Mr Avery said: “The Sandero’s Euro NCAP rating is a major disappointment and it’s therefore not a new car we would recommend.”

Euro NCAP secretary general Michiel van Ratingen added: “Clearly, Dacia have found their market and they’re sticking to it, but a two-star rating shows little ambition, even for a low-cost product.”

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