Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage

Just in time for the latest Star Wars movie.

Anyone who grew up watching the original Star Wars trilogy, or for those who have seen the movie in its remastered form in the 90s, will remember that the opening 30 minutes would have already exposed us to a myriad of vehicles and starships that inhabit the Star Wars universe. Sure, Star Destroyers are iconic, and so is the Corellian Corvette that was trying to outrun Darth Vader’s grasp, but the very first land vehicle that reveals itself to millions of viewers is undoubtedly the landspeeder. To be more specific, Luke Skywalker’s rickety and has-seen-better-days landspeeder on the desert planet of Tatooine. 

Gallery: Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage

Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage
Geek Out Over This Landspeedster Built In A Garage

Don’t try to deny it, but those who were young enough at the time imagined driving their own landspeeder, floating across the wide expanse at high speed. Thank to Colin Furze, celebrity YouTube inventor and fabricator, we get to live vicariously through his latest project. In the vide you can watch above or using this link, he recreates the Luke’s iconic landspeeder, using a ton of parts ordered online, metal and wood pieces, a golf cart, and a ton of patience and elbow grease. Using an electric golf cart as the chassis for his new creation (because a gasoline golf cart doesn’t make the right sounds), he then completely strips it down to the frame, even going as far as taking apart the motor and replacing it with a more powerful 13kW version with completely new gearing. He then creates the cockpit out of plywood, making sure to scale it properly, and assembles the steering wheel and steering column. The initial idea was to fiberglass it, but due to time and weight constraints, sheet metal was chosen to create the rest of the landspeeder’s curves in the nose and engine nacelles. 

We won’t talk you through the rest of the process, since the best way to experience this build is to watch the full 12-minute video. It’s a thoroughly entertaining and totally excusable and geeky way to spend a quarter of an hour on YouTube. And while it doesn’t actually float, this very well could be the Star Wars invention you’ve been looking for. 

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