2022 GM Fullsize Trucks, SUVs Getting Buckle To Drive Restriction

The safety feature will also be employed beyond the driver seat.

Seatbelts have evolved from being an option to ultimate requirements in cars over the years. There are several unfortunate accidents that involved seatbelts in the past, or the lack thereof, which should be concrete proof of their importance in automobile usage.

These days, you’d be hard-pressed to find a car that doesn’t have a seatbelt reminder, making it a basic yet very important safety feature. GM takes it up a notch by introducing the ‘Buckle to Drive’ feature – first as a setting of Teen Driver Mode then immediately began a standard feature for all drivers of smaller GM cars.

Gallery: 2022 Chevrolet Silverado ZR2 Trail Boss Spy Shots








However, GM isn’t stopping there; the ‘Buckle to Drive’ feature will also become available in full-size trucks and SUVs for the 2022 model year, as indicated on the GM Techlink website. 

Both the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra are getting a major revamp for the 2022 model year. Beyond the inevitable aesthetic and mechanical changes, we can also expect the next GM full-size trucks to get the ‘Buckle to Drive’ feature as part of its standard safety equipment.

Of note, the GM Techlink website mentions that the following 2022 model year GM trucks and SUVs will have the feature as standard: Traverse, Tahoe, Suburban, Silverado, Sierra, Yukon, Hummer, and Escalade.

Though not mentioned, it’s safe to say that the feature will be available on the upcoming Silverado EV as well.

More importantly, the GM Techlink website also indicated that in the 2023 model year, the ‘Buckle to Drive’ feature will also be employed in the passenger seat.

For the uninitiated, a vehicle equipped with the ‘Buckle to Drive’ feature won’t let the driver shift out of Park if the seatbelt’s unbuckled. It can be turned off, however, by going through the vehicle’s settings, but we believe drivers shouldn’t do so in the name of safety.

Source:

GM Techlink via The Drive

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