2019 Honda Accord 2.0T essentials: The family sedan is alive and well

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

The 2019 Honda Accord Touring comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four making 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

What is it: Honda’s best-selling family sedan is now in its 10th generation, and it’s fair to say this is the best Accord ever. In keeping with its mission, the Accord is still affordable too, starting at around $24,000 well-equipped; note that our pricey tester is the top-of-the-line Accord Touring with a stout 2-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine. There’s no more V6 Accord; even though we miss its growl, most buyers will be perfectly happy with the strong turbo four.

Key Competitors: Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima, Chevrolet Malibu

Base Price: $35,950 As-Tested Price: $36,870

Full review: 2019 Honda Accord first drive

Highlights: Amidst all the hand-wringing about the death of family sedans, I have two pieces of good news: First, Honda sold nearly 22,000 Accords last month — down almost 20 percent, but still a LOT of Accords; second, the 2019 Accord is a fantastic midsize sedan, and if you neither want nor need an SUV, there’s a brilliantly executed, competitively priced car ready at your local Honda dealer.

 

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.

The 2019 Honda Accord has a well thought out interior.
















Our Opinion: The Accord range has gotten downright huge over the past few generations, even as the sedan market has shrunk, and there’s now a mid-size Honda to suit just about any budget and taste. There’s even a hybrid with 48 mpg combined and no oddball styling penalty. The Sport is still my personal sweet spot for price/features, but for those who want a truly premium car without the Audi/BMW/Lexus price, the Accord Touring 2.0T has to be among the most well-rounded cars on the market today.

Low-slung and attractive, the latest Accord adopts the semi-fastback styling popularized by cars like the Audi A7 and Mercedes-Benz CLS. Clever packaging means there’s very little sacrifice for the swoopiness — the Accord’s trunk is huge and rear seat passengers benefit from plenty of leg- and headroom. Critical for family sedan shoppers, Honda builds its Honda Sensing safety technologies into every trim level — it includes all the most recent safety nannies like collision mitigation braking, lane departure warning, adaptive cruse control and lane keeping assist even on the basic LX.

This, though, is the Touring 2.0T, which denotes the 2-liter turbocharged four-cylinder — it’s the new top-end powertrain for the Accord, now that the V6 has dropped off the menu. With 252 hp and 273 lb-ft of torque from a low 1500 rpm, the four is arguably a better powertrain than the V6 in almost all situations. And Honda’s 10-speed (!) automatic transmission means the engine can always find an appropriate gear, though there’s occasionally a slight lag as it sorts through its available options. If there’s any downside it’s that fuel economy is only about 26 mpg combined — if your priority is gas mileage choose the hybrid powertrain which is also available on the Touring trim level.

Touring also adds just about everything you’d find on any number of premium German sedans: A head-up display projecting information onto the windshield, heated front and rear seats plus ventilated fronts, wireless phone charging, navigation and rain-sensing wipers, among other features. Most of it’s not essential, but it turns the Accord Touring into a powerful, fully-featured, do-everything daily driver. The only reason I can think of to pay more is to keep up with the neighbors, or because you’ve convinced yourself you need all-wheel drive.

Honda nailed this one, and if you’re among the thousands of new car shoppers out there who still want an honest-to-goodness sedan, go test-drive an Accord.

Base Price: $35,950

As-Tested Price: $36,870

Drivetrain: 2.0-liter turbocharged I4, 10-speed automatic, FWD

Output: 252 hp @ 6,500 rpm; 273 lb-ft @ 1,500-4,000 rpm

Curb Weight: 3,428 lb

Fuel Economy (EPA City/Highway/Combined): 22/32/26 mpg

Pros: It’s the complete package

Cons: Honda badge may not be aspirational enough for some potential buyers

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